Friday, January 31, 2014

EXTREMELY RARE GRUEN DAY/NIGHT MILITARY GENTS WRISTWATCH











BRAND/JENAMA: EXTREMELY RARE GRUEN DAY/NIGHT MILITARY GENTS WRISTWATCH
MADE IN/BUATAN: SWISS
CIRCA/TAHUN: 1940's
MODEL: DAY/NIGHT
CRYSTAL/CERMIN: ACRYLIC
MOVEMENT/ENJIN: SWISS AGLEAR GRUEN GUILD 15 JEWELS MANUAL WINDING MOVEMENT CAL. N510 CA
DIAL COLOR: SILVER - MINT
FUNCTION/FUNGSI: HOUR, MINUTE AND CENTER SECOND
HANDS/JARUM: LUMINOUS SWORD METAL HANDS
MARKERS/TANDA WAKTU: GREEN FOR DAY AND BLACK FOR NIGHT DIAMOND MARKERS
CASING : SOLID STAINLESS STEEL - 33mm with crown and 38mm lug to lug
LUGS: 16mm UNIQUE DESIGN HARD TO FIND
CROWN: big 10K GOLD FILLED
DITANDA/ENGARVED BACK CASING: GRUEN
STRAP/TALI: NEW GENUINE GREEN  LEATHER BAND
SIZE STRAP/SAIZ TALI: 8.5"
WORKING CONDITION COLOR CHANGED AT 12:00, KEEPING TIME, DISCONTINUED MODEL & HARD TO FIND
PRICE/HARGA: PERSONAL COLLECTION (RETAIL PRICE FOR THIS PREOWNED RARE WATCH IS BETWEEN USD1000 - USD2,500 depending on material type and condition on the watch)

Gruen Watch Company
On June 12, 1874 Dietrich Gruen applied for a patent on an improved safety pinion, which was granted on December 22. He was 27 years old.

In 1876 he formed the Columbus Watch Manufacturing Company in the basement of a downtown Columbus, Ohio bank building.

In his Columbus workshop, Dietrich modified, finished and cased raw movements that were imported from Switzerland. These new watches included his patented safety pinion. Dietrich introduced 16-size watches as an alternative to the heavy and thick 18-size and larger watches that were prevalent at the time. He also introduced the first stemwind watches sold in the U.S. market.

As the company grew, they moved to two floors in a commerical building a few blocks away.

In 1882, in collaboration with a number of new partners, the company was reorganized as the Columbus Watch Company and moved to a newly-constructed factory building located on Thurman Street, in the 'German Village' section of Columbus. Dietrich was President of the new corporation.

By 1888 production was about 45 watches per day; the company would grow to 300 employees and output to 150 watches per day. Although the company continued to issue stemwind watches, they also manufactured keywind movements for some of their less-expensive models.

After a series of disagreements with the other partners, Dietrich Gruen and his son Fred left the Columbus Watch Company in 1894, shortly before the business went bankrupt. Dietrich had lost his share of the company to the investors, and was faced with the prospect of staying on as a salaried employee at the company that he had founded. He chose to leave rather than bear this indignity. After the departure of the Gruens the firm was reorganized, refinanced and renamed "The New Columbus Watch Company."

The New Columbus Watch Company survived until 1903. The contents of the factory, including all the tooling and stocks of movements, were eventually purchased by the Studebaker family, moved to Indiana (along with many key employees) and used to start the South Bend Watch Company. Some early South Bend watches were sold with signed Columbus movements in them.

In 1894, Fred Gruen and Dietrich Gruen decided to try to start a new watch company. Using money borrowed from friends and relatives, Dietrich and Fred formed the partnership "D. Gruen and Son.".

These first Gruen watches are of very high quality and are beautifully made. Both 18 and 16 size versions were manufactured, each in both open face and hunter styles, and in 18- and 21-jewel versions. The earliest D. Gruen & Son serial numbers started around 62000. The Gruens dealt directly with individual jewelry stores; there were no wholesalers or jobbers involved in the distribution of their watches.

In 1898 George Gruen joined the firm as treasurer and financial officer. The company incorporated and its name changed to D. Gruen, Sons & Company.

In 1903 Gruen introduces its "VeriThin" line of watches.

In 1908 Gruen introduced both men's and women's wristwatches. These proved popular only with women. Gruen was one of a very few companies to take wristwatches seriously this early, seeing their potential in spite of disappointing early sales to male customers.

Gruen made both wrist and pocket watches for the military during World War I. Most had silver cases, which would tarnish but would not corrode under adverse conditions. To satisfy U.S. military regulations, these watches all have luminous dial markings and hands.

1911 Dietrich Gruen dies suddenly. Fred Gruen takes control of the company.

In 1913 the company purchased Nanny Goat Hill, a pasture just outside of Cincinnati, and renamed it Time Hill. Work began on a new building designed by architect Guy C. Burroughs at a construction cost estimated at $50,000 USD. The company moved to the new location in 1917.

1921: Gruen introduces The Cartouche wrist watch calling it "The logical wrist watch shape".

1922: Gruen introduces "The Pentagon" pocket watch. "the Croix de Guerre of American achievement"

Up until 1922 there had actually been three Gruen companies: D. Gruen, Sons & Company; The Gruen National Watch Case Company of Cincinnati; and The Gruen Watch Manufacturing Company of Biel, Switzerland. In 1922 all three businesses were merged to form the Gruen Watch Company, with Fred as President.

In 1924, Gruen released a special pocket watch in an edition of 600 to commemorate their 50th anniversary. The watch cost $500 at the time.

In 1925, Gruen introduced the men's Quadron. These were rectangular watches containing very high-quality 15-j or 17-j tonneau-shaped movements.

In 1928 Gruen releases The Techni-Quadron. The famous Techni-Quadron "doctor's watches" are so-called because the large seconds dial was handy for timing a patient's pulse.

In 1935 Fred Gruen, now 63 years old, became Chairman of the Board and Benjamin S. Katz was brought in as President of the Gruen Watch Company. In 1935, Gruen was about $1.8 million USD (roughly $36 million USD today) in debt; nervous stockholders and investors were behind the change. Fred would retire in 1940, but continued to sit on the board for the rest of his life.

In 1935 Gruen introduces the most famous Gruen wristwatch- "The Curvex". These watches are one of the greatest examples of 1930s streamlined design.

1937: Gruen introduces "The Ristside" or "driver's" watches.

In 1938, continuing the success of their VeriThin pocket watches, Gruen also launched a series of Veri-Thin wristwatches. Contemporary Curvex and Veri-Thin movements often are closely related, and can share many parts. By the 1940s, most Gruen wristwatches were either Veri-Thin or Curvex models.

Although Gruen did not manufacture watches for the U.S. military, they offered the public a collection of eight military-style watches, to be used as personal watches.

In 1949, the company introduced their first watches made entirely in the U.S., a line of 21-jewel men's models called the "Gruen 21". The movements are marked "Cincinnati" or "US" instead of the usual "Switzerland."

Fred Gruen retired in 1940 and died in 1945, and his brother George died in 1952. In 1953 the Gruen family sold their interest in the company. The same year, Gruen president Benjamin Katz was forced into retirement after a scandal, and in 1954 the company bought out his shares for $2 million USD.

In 1953, the Gruen Watch Company had its highest sales in its entire history.Gruen, Rolex and Aegler

One of the most deeply-held myths about Gruen is that Gruen and Rolex at one time manufactured movements for each other's watches. Both firms did use some of the same movements—the best known examples are the Gruen Techi-Quadron and its twin, the Rolex Prince. In reality, these movements were manufactured by a third company, Aegler, who was a very close neighbor to the Gruen Precision Factory. They were Aegler's biggest customers, and were both large shareholders as well—the full company name at one time was, Aegler, Societe Anonyme, Fabrique des Montres Rolex & Gruen Guild A. Gruen and Rolex both occasionally showed pictures of the huge Aegler factory in their advertising, making the implication that this was a Gruen- or Rolex-owned facility, although ownership at the time was divided among Gruen, Rolex and Aegler itself. Gruen sold their Aegler shares in the 1930s, after they moved all production to the Precision Factory. After this time, Aegler became increasingly tied to Rolex through the sale of stock. Today, the main Rolex building in Biel is the old Aegler factory, and though it is now owned by Rolex, it is still run by the Aegler family.

This article taken from Complete Price Guide to Watches, American Wriswatches, Rolex Wristwatches: Best of Time and Gruen Master Book

AUTHENTIC 1964 ROLEX OYSTER ROYAL GENTS WRISTWATCH










BRAND/JENAMA: AUTHENTIC VINTAGE ROLEX OYSTER ROYAL PRECISION 6444 GENTS WRISTWATCH
MADE IN/BUATAN: SWISS
CIRCA/TAHUN: 1964 S/N 1551863
MODEL: OYSTER ROYAL
CRYSTAL/CERMIN: ACRYLIC
MOVEMENT/ENJIN: ROLEX PRECISION 17 JEWELS MANUAL WINDING MOVEMENT
DIAL COLOR: PATINATED GREY DIAL
FUNCTION/FUNGSI: -
HANDS/JARUM: LUMINOUS (NO LONGER LUMED) SILVER TONE SWORD HANDS
MARKERS/TANDA WAKTU: SILVER TONE ARROW HEAD MARKERS
CASING : SOLID STAINLESS STEEL
LUGS: 18mm
MEASUREMENT/UKURAN: 32mm DIAMETER INCLUDING CROWN and 40mm LUG TO LUG
BEZEL: 18K SOLID GOLD BEZEL
DITANDA/ENGARVED BACK CASING: NONE
CROWN: ORIGINAL ROLEX 1 STEPS SOLID GOLD CROWN
STRAP/TALI: GENUINE BROWN LEATHER BAND
SIZE STRAP/SAIZ TALI: 8.5" FULL LENGHT

DISCONTINUED ROLEX ROYAL MODEL... RARE!
EXCELLENT CONDITION, KEEPING GOODTIME AND RECENTLY SERVICED
PRICE: RM4000 (NEGOTIABLE)

-->
BRIEF HISTORY OF ROLEX AND TUDOR WATCHES

The Rolex brand was created by a visionary named Hans Wilsdorf, who was born in Bavaria in the year 1881. Just before the turn of the century young Hans moved to Geneva, and at the age of nineteen discovered the industry of watchmaking. At that time the wristwatch was considered vulgar and uncouth; gentlemen of the day carried pocketwatches. Wristwatches were worn only by women, and the tiny delicate movements were unreliable and imprecise. Leading watchmakers were convinced that the challenges involved in creating an accurate timekeeping device in such a small package were insurmountable. Hans Wilsdorf disagreed. He saw much room for improvement in an industry dominated by traditional thinking.

In 1905 Wilsdorf relocated to London and founded Wilsdorf & Davis in association with his brother-in-law Alfred, a company which manufactured watch cases and distributed wristwatches. Wilsdorf always maintained a very high standard for the quality of his products, so he was continually seeking ways to improve the design of his cases and movements. In cooperation with the firm of Aegler in Bienne, Switzerland, he developed and improved the small-caliber lever escapement movement, and was confident enough to stake a loan of five times the total capital of Wilsdorf & Davis in the first order. From then on, Wilsdorf made and sold watches; his own cases with movements imported from Switzerland. After the turn of the century as wristwatches started to enter the mainstream (as soldiers wore watches on their wrists and the general perception changed from the earlier notion that wristwatches were strictly feminine), Wilsdorf quickly saw how he could take advantage of their emerging popularity by offering a variety of case designs: formal, sporty, casual, etc. He also realized the importance of brand recognition. Until then the custom had been for the retailer�s name to appear on both the dial and the movement, but Wilsdorf wanted to distinguish his watches from those of his competitors, which he considered inferior since they did not submit their products to the exacting tests which he insisted be performed on all of his own. Hence in 1908 he coined the name Rolex, which would henceforth appear on all parts of the watch, including dial, movement, case, and bracelet. No one knows for sure where he got the name; there are many theories on the subject. But everyone agrees that Rolex is a name anyone in Europe or the world at large could easily pronounce, and is short enough to fit comfortably on the dial of any wristwatch.

History was first made by Rolex in 1910 when a movement was sent to the School of Horology at Bienne, and was awarded a chronometer bulletin. This was the first time a wristwatch had ever received the chronometer rating, and suddenly Hans Wilsdorf's brand earned the respect of horologists the world over. Four years later a Rolex movement was awarded a Class A Certificate by the Royal Observatory at Kew, again the first small caliber watch movement to receive the award. Thereupon Wilsdorf decided that all Rolex timepieces should be submitted to similar tests carried out by impartial institutes. No Rolex watch would ever again be sold without its Official Timing Certificate. After World War I, Wilsdorf moved his operation to Geneva to avoid the exorbitant import taxes in England, and renamed his company Montres Rolex S.A., and later simply Rolex S.A. The Aegler company of Bienne provided watch movements to many companies, but only Rolex demanded that each and every movement undergo a weeklong battery of meticulous tests before they would be accepted. Any irregularity whatsoever meant the movement was returned to the workshops. It was due to these stringent methods of quality control that Rolex was able to achieve such high standards in accuracy and make such advancements in the world of horology.

Wilsdorf had long ago realized that for a watch to be accurate over the long term, its case would need not only to withstand the attack of dust and water, but would need to be self winding to protect the mainspring from stress caused by overwinding. The first problem was overcome in 1926 with the creation of the Rolex "Oyster", in which the winding crown was screwed down onto the case using a twin lock system. This brilliant watch was totally protected from the environment since the case was air tight as well as waterproof. In a well publicized event the following year, the Oyster was celebrated after being worn on the wrist by Mercedes Gleitze when she swam the English Channel. The watch made world headlines for keeping perfect time after being immersed in salt water for 15 hours. The Oyster was displayed in jewelry shop windows inside aquariums; keeping time while fish swam through the bracelet.

The first self-winding movement was invented by Abram-Louis Perrelet in the mid 1800's, and later perfected by Abram-Louis Breguet, but was never widely adopted because the mechanism was too delicate for daily use. In 1923 a British watchmaker named John Harwood patented a self-winding watch movement based on a "hammer winding system", which had a semi-circular weight that pivoted at the center of the movement and swung through a 300 degree arc. The swinging weight was actuated by the movement of the wearer. Wilsdorf discarded this system as too impractical. For one thing, Harwood's watch was unable to be set except by turning the bezel, and it used an unreliable friction plate to prevent overwinding. According to Wilsdorf, a truly self-winding watch should be completely automatic, silent, able to revolve in both directions, smooth in action and completely free of buffer springs. These obstacles were surmounted in 1931 when Emile Borer, the technical head of Rolex, invented the "Rotor", whose winding mass could turn both clockwise and counter-clockwise and pivot freely on its axis. The new movement was dubbed the Rolex Oyster Perpetual, and immediately became the world standard, imitated by every watchmaker since.

AUTHENTIC RARE VINTAGE ROLEX BUBBLEBACK 6084 GENTS WRISTWATCH









BRAND/JENAMA: HIGHLY SOUGHT AFTER AUTHENTIC VINTAGE ROLEX OYSTER PERPETUAL SUPERLATIVE CHRONOMETER "BUBBLEBACK" GENTS WRISTWATCH
MADE IN/BUATAN: SWISS
CIRCA/TAHUN: 1953 - S/N 934060
MODEL: OYSTER PERPETUAL BUBBLEBACK MODEL 6085
CRYSTAL/CERMIN: ACRYLIC
MOVEMENT/ENJIN: ROLEX 18 JEWELS AUTOMATIC WINDING MOVEMENT CAL. 1030
DIAL COLOR: SATIN FINISH CREAM DIAL FAIRLY PATINATED
FUNCTION/FUNGSI: HOUR, MINUTES AND SWIPE SECOND
HANDS/JARUM: LUMINOUS SILVER TONE ALPHA HANDS
MARKERS/TANDA WAKTU: RAISED SILVER TONE ARROW HEAD MARKERS
CASING : 18K SOLID GOLD BEZEL AND SOLID STAINLESS STEEL
LUGS: 18mm
MEASUREMENT/UKURAN: 34mm DIAMETER W/O CROWN and 40mm LUG TO LUG
BEZEL: 18K WHITE GOLD
ENGRAVED BACK CASING: -
CROWN: ORIGINAL SOLID 18K GOLD ROLEX 1 STEPS SS CORONATE CROWN 
STRAP/TALI: NON ROLEX GOLD PLATED STRECH BAND
SIZE STRAP/SAIZ TALI: 8.5" FULL LENGHT
DISCONTINUED ROLEX MODEL... RARE BIG BUBBLEBACK IN MINT CONDITION!
EXCELLENT CONDITION, KEEPING GOODTIME AND RECENTLY SERVICED
PRICE: RM9,000 (NEGOTIABLE)

A History of Rolex Watches


Hans Wilsdorf founded the company we now know as Rolex in 1905. Born in Kulmbach, Germany in 1881, the company, Wilsdorf & Davies, was based in London. By 1908 it had become one of the leading watch companies in the UK. It was in this year that he coined the name Rolex.
Official Chronometer Certification was awarded to Rolex in 1910 from the "Bureau Officiel" in Switzerland, the first time this had ever been given to a wristwatch. This was to be the first of many accolades awarded to the watch, including the Class A Precision from the Kew Observatory in 1914.
In 1926 the Rolex Oyster was released. It was the first wristwatch to be considered waterproof, proven a year later when the watch was worn by the swimmer Mercedes Gleitze in his successful bid to cross the English Channel. This was beneficial to Wilsdorf whom had sponsored the event and gained considerable exposure for his new Oyster Watch. Wilsdorf recognized the importance of advertising and marketing his creation in order to gain publicity and prestige. 1931 saw the creation of the Perpetual Rotor, a mechanism now seen as the basis for self-winding movements. In the following years Rolex released the first Oyster Perpetual Lady-date (1954) the GMT Master with dual time zone function (1955) and the first Day-Date (1956).
Andre Heiniger took over the company following the death of Hans Wildorf on 06 July 1960. Rolex continued to invent and innovate in terms of technical skill and style throughout the 2nd half of the century. The Sea-dweller (1967) was certified as reaching depths of up to 1,220 meters making it the choice for Professional Divers - a point that was quickly adopted in advertising the model. The Explorer II (1978) and Cosmograph Daytona (1988) were also released to international waiting lists securing Rolex as one of the worlds most prestigious watch brands.

Rolex Dateline

  • 1905 - Hans Wildorf establishes a London firm specialising in the distribution of watches.
  • 1908 - Wildorf coins a brand name in which to sign his creations: Rolex.
  • 1910 - In Switzerland, Rolex obtains the first official chronometer certification ever awarded to a wristwatch.
  • 1914 - The Kew Observatory in Great Britain awards the Rolex wristwatch a CLASS A precision certificate.
  • 1926 - Rolex develops and patents the first airtight, dustproof and waterproof watch - named the Oyster.
  • 1927 - The Rolex Oyster crosses the English Channel unscathed.
  • 1931 - Birth of the Perpetual Rotor, a self winding mechanism later found in every modern automatic watch.
  • 1945 - The Oyster Datejust is invented. The first watch to display the date automatically.
  • 1953 - Rolex has created the diving watch of reference - the Submariner.
  • 1954 - The Oyster Perpetual Ladydate is introduced.
  • 1955 - The Oyster GMT Master is designed making it possible to read the time in any two time zones.
  • 1956 - The Oyster Day-Date is created.
  • 1960 - The so called Bathyscaphe is created and plunges 35,787 feet into the Mariana Trench in the Pacific Ocean.
  • 1967 - The Oyster Sea-Dweller is invented - waterproof to a depth of 610 m / 2001 ft.
  • 1971 - The Oyster Explorer II is designed.
  • 1978 - The Oyster Perpetual Date Sea-Dweller is tested waterproof to a depth of 1220 m / 4003 ft.
  • 1988 - The first Cosmograph Daytona is fitted with a perpetual rotor.
  • 1992 - A new model is added to the Professioanl range - the Yacht-Master.
  • 2004 - Submariner celebrates its 50th Anniversary. Rolex celebrates with a special commemorative model with a green bezel and unique black dial.


Thursday, January 30, 2014

AUTHENTIC VINTAGE 10K GOLD FILLED LECOULTRE MEMOVOX WRISTALARM GENTS WRISTWATCH












LARGE AND BRIGHTLY LUMINOUS AND LOUD LECOULTRE
WRISTALARM WATCH


BRAND/JENAMA: AUTHENTIC VINTAGE LARGE 10K GOLD FILLED LECOULTRE WRISTALARM GENTS WRISTWATCH
MADE IN/BUATAN: SWISS
CIRCA/TAHUN: 1950's
MODEL: ALARM - MEMOVOX
CRYSTAL/CERMIN: ACRYLIC
MOVEMENT/ENJIN: RARE LECOULTRE 17 JEWELS MANUAL MOVEMENT CAL.814 BY VACHERON CONSTATIN AXN
DIAL COLOR: CREAM GOLD
FUNCTION/FUNGSI: HOUR, MINUTE, SECOND AND ALARM DISC
HANDS/JARUM: GOLD TONE AND BLUE METAL SECOND HAND
MARKERS/TANDA WAKTU: VERY BRIGHT LUMINOUS DOT, LUMINOUS ARABIC AND RAISED GOLD TONE BARROW HEAD MARKERS
CASING : 10K GOLD FILLED
LUGS: 18mm
MEASUREMENT/UKURAN: 37mm DIAMETER INCLUDING CROWN and 42mm LUG TO LUG
BEZEL: 10K GOLD FILLED BEZEL
DITANDA/ENGARVED BACK CASING: N.G.T 1-28-57
CROWN: UNSIGNED ORIGINAL CROWN
STRAP/TALI: BROWN LEATHER BAND
SIZE STRAP/SAIZ TALI: 9.5" FULL LENGHT
DISCONTINUED LECOULTRE MODEL... ALARM SET AND LOUD!
EXCELLENT CONDITION, KEEPING GOODTIME AND RECENTLY SERVICED
PRICE/HARGA: PERSONAL COLLECTION NOT FOR SALE
A BRIEF HISTORY OF LE COULTRE WATCHES
A brilliant inventor and self-taught watchmaker, Antoine-LeCoultre founded his first workshop in 1833, following the invention of a machine to produce watchmaking pinions. Ever since, the Manufacture Jaeger-Lecoultre has developed constantly around the founder's original workshops.
Surprisingly enough, it was neither a physicist nor an engineer who first measured the micron; it was Antoine LeCoultre, in 1844. He had created watch components that were so perfect no tool could actually detect their degree of inaccuracy. He followed that up by inventing the world's most accurate instrument: the Millionometer, which served as a benchmark for over half a century.
In 1847, LeCoultre created a revolutionary system that was to do away with the need for keys to rewind and set watches. His simple and brilliant solution was a pushbutton that activated a lever to switch from one function to another. It was the first keyless winding mechanism, and the first reliable system that eliminated the need for keys to wind or set a watch.
In 1866, when Swiss watchmaking was still structured around small home-run workshops, Antoine LeCoultre and his son Elie decided to bring together under one rood the many skills involved in making watches, and installed a steam-driven machine to operate their new tools. LeCoultre & Cie thus became the first Manufacture in the Vallée de Joux.
It was in 1903 when the Parisian Edmond Jaeger set Swiss watchmakers the challenge of producing ultra-thin calibres. It would lead to the Calibre 145, the world's thinnest mechanical movement, measuring no more than 1.38 mm, and the friendship of Antoine LeCoultre's grandson, Jacques-Devid LeCoultre. These two men would give a rise to a range of horological wonders, and eventually the birth of the Jaeger-LeCoultre brand in 1937.
In the year 1908, the Manufacture created its first rectangular-shaped calibre in response to the challenge created to miniaturize watches to wear on the wrist. By the "Roaring 20s" (1920s), very small ladies' wristwatches were all the rage, but extreme miniaturization always led to a loss of reliability and precision. The Duoplan brilliantly solved this problem by arranging its parts on split levels. It would lead to the world's smallest movement, Calibre 101. Outdoing the Calibre 145, Jaeger-Lecoultre miniaturized the Duoplan caliber to the extreme, weighing in at barely one gram and comprising of 74 parts. Its record is still unmatched to this date.
Since its founding, the Manufacture has created and produced over 1,000 different calibres in many varieties. Over 200 patented inventions have contributed to the progress of Swiss watchmaking in the field of movements, as well as that of cases, bracelets, dials, and watch functions.

Wednesday, January 1, 2014

EXTREMELY RARE HATTORI SEIKOSHA WWI MILITARY WATCHES











BRAND/JENAMA : EXTREMELY RARE HATTORI SEIKOSHA WWI MILITARY WATCHES
MODEL : NATION
MOVEMENT :SUPRARE SEIKOSHA MANUAL WINDING MOVEMENT
ORIGIN : JAPAN
SERIAL NO. : none
CIRCA : 1920"s
CASING : SOLID STAINLESS STEEL
FUNCTION : HOUR, MINUTES, SUB SECOND AT 6:00
DIAL: WHITE CREAM WITH CIRCULAR TEXTURED AROUND HOUR MAKER
BEZEL: SOLID STAINLESS STEEL 
MARKINGS : DIAL
BAND :
 REPLACEMENT BLACK LEATHER MILITARY BUND BAND FIT 8" WRIST
LUGS SIZE: 12mm WIRELUGS
BAND WIDTH: 14mm
LENS/CERMIN : ACRYLIC CRYSTAL
MEASUREMENT : 24mm WITHOUT  CROWN X 30mm LUG TO LUG
WATER RESISTANT: NO - VINTAGE WWI WATCH, WATERPROOF WATCH HAS NOT BEEN INVENTED YET
CONDITION : EXCELLENT WORKING CONDITION
PRICE/HARGA: PERSONAL COLLECTION BUT WILLING TO LET GO FOR USD2,500 (RETAIL APPRAISAL FOR THIS EXTREMELY RARE TIME PIECE IS BETWEEN USD2,700 TO USD3,500 DEPENDING ON THE CONDITION OF THE WATCH ) 
LISTING: USD2500.00 SOLD: RM1000


BRIEF INFORMATION ON SEIKO WRISTWATCHES


The company started with the name Seiko in 1938. However, the original ancestor of the company was a business run by a local clockmaker in Tokyo by the name, Kintaro Hattori. The business was named K. Hattori and later it evolved into a company by the name Seiko corporation, Tokyo. The business originally started as a clock and jewellery shop and in 1892. It began production of clocks under the name Seikosha, which later evolved into Seiko.

In 1917,  DAINI SEIKOSHA WAS SEEKING WESTERN TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE THEIR CAPABILITIES TO PRODUCE MODERN WATCHES. THEY INVITED SWISS AND AMERICAN WATCH COMPANIES TO JAPAN. THEY DID WHAT THE JAPANESE DO BEST. UNDER THE BANNER OF POSSIBLE EXPORTS, THESE COMPANIES WOULD, IN FACT, TEACH THE JAPANESE WOW TO MAKE WATCHES THAT, BY THE 1950'S, WOULD COMPETE TOE TO TOE, WITH THE ENTIRE GLOBAL WATCH COMMUNITY.

MANY EARLY SEIKOSHA MILITARY WATCHES HAD WALTHAM MOVEMENTS! IN ADDITION, SWISS TECHNOLOGY AND FINISHING TECHNIQUES CAN BE FOUND IN THE LIMITED ANTIQUE VINTAGE TIME PIECES, SUCH AS THIS 1929/30 SEIKOSHA NATION MOVEMENT WITH ITS "SWISS BARS" FINISH. 



NOTE  "NATION" IS LISTED AS A SEIKO  ON PAGE 28 IN THE BOOK "Museum of Japanese Made Watches".  WHAT WE HAVE TO UNDERSTAND IS THAT SEIKO WAS NOT A SEPARATE  COMPANY IN 1929. 

Initially the company was named K. Hattori & Co in 1918. Later named as Hattori Seiko & Co in 1983. Finally, in 1990 it became Seiko corporations. It established various companies under its name such as Seiko Watch Corporation, and became a holding corporation in 2001 and was finally named as Seiko Holdings Corporation in 2007. Although the company produces many different types of clocks and watches, it is particularly famous for its wristwatches.

In 1924, the first watch under the name Seiko was produced. Seiko also has the honour of producing the first quartz watch in the world under the name Astron. Thus by this fact only, one can get a basic idea of the rank of Seiko watches in the world of wristwatches. When this watch was first introduced, its cost was more than that of a medium sized car. However, this watch was a breakthrough in technology and set a new standard, which is being followed to this day.
In 1985 Seiko and orient watches set up a joint factory, which produces millions of watches each year. Seiko watches are known for their reliability and accuracy in time keeping, which is why their watches have been used for official time keeping in major sports events and the Olympic Games, which is also an honourable rank for the company.
The company produces different lines of watches of which, the most famous are Seiko 5, Grand Seiko, King Seiko and Credor. Collectors, due to their high esteem and unique features, treasure these watches as prized possessions. Seiko mechanical watches are especially considered as prized possession by collectors. When it comes to Seiko classic watches, the older a watch, the more precious it is.
Seiko wristwatches range from 50$ to 100,000$, which is certainly a price tag for luxury and high esteem. The Seiko kinetic watches being produced these days take the major portion of their sales in the modern era as they combine the self-energising feature of automatic watches with the high accuracy of quartz in time keeping.